1st Peter 1:20

1st Peter 1:20-21 (see also 1st Peter 1:1-2; Romans 8:29)
For He was foreknown before the foundation of the world, but has appeared in these last times for the sake of you who through Him are believers in God, who raised Him from the dead and gave Him glory, so that your faith and hope are in God.











That is a suspect translation since the Greek word used at 1st Peter 1:20 is “proginosko” [foreknown], rather thanprographo” [foreordained].





















All statements where “before the foundation of the world” is used, is given with reference to Christ. (John 17:24; Ephesians 1:4; 1 Peter 1:20)

All statements where “from the foundation of the world” is used, is given with reference to man, moving us from a point of reference forward. (Matthew 25:34; Luke 11:50; Revelation 13:8)

One member of The Society of Evangelical Arminians explains:When we are joined to Christ, His election becomes our election. Since Christ was elect from eternity, we can also be said to be elect from eternity, as we are identified with Him. In that sense, His history becomes our history, just as we can be said to have been crucified with Him, etc.” (SEA)


The King James Version of 1st Peter 1:20 reads: Who verily was foreordained before the foundation of the world, but was manifest in these last times for you.…
Question:  Why did the translators of the King James Version translate the wrong Greek word

Answer:  Because they were Calvinists? Calvinist, Colin Maxwell, writes: “If you are a KJV only man…do remember the KJV translators were Calvinists to a man.” (A Word to those who take it upon themselves to write against Calvinism) So is there a bias perhaps? Why intentionally translate the wrong Greek word? Why did the translators of the New American Standard, instead, translate it correctly? By no means am I suggesting that the translators of the New American Standard were non-Calvinists. Rather, I’m simply asking the question of why the difference?